Lunar Eclipse

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Weekend Lunar Eclipse

Total lunar eclipse. Credits: Antonio Finazzi and Michele Festa

[Spaceweather.com Press Release - 15.08.2008]
This Saturday, August 16th, people on every continent *except* North America can see a lunar eclipse. At maximum, around 2110 UT (5:10 pm EDT), more than 81% of the Moon will be inside Earth's shadow, producing a vivid red orb in the night sky visible to the naked eye even from light-polluted cities. The entire eclipse lasts more than 3 hours, so there's plenty of time for gazing, drinking coffee, and taking pictures.

Total Lunar Eclipse Draws Attention Back to the Moon

Total lunar eclipse. Credits: Antonio Finazzi and Michele Festa

[NASA Press Release - 21.08.2007]
As August draws to an end, watchers of the night sky will be in for a treat. In the early morning hours of August 28, sky watchers across much of the world can look on as the Moon crosses in to the shadow of the Earth, becoming completely immersed for one-hour and 30 minutes, a period of time much longer than most typical lunar eclipses. In fact, this eclipse will be the deepest and longest in 7 years.

Dreamy Lunar Eclipse

Total lunar eclipse. Credits: Antonio Finazzi and Michele Festa

[NASA Press Release - 03.08.2007]
August 3, 2007: Close your eyes, breath deeply, let your mind wander to a distant seashore: It's late in the day, and the western sun is sinking into the glittering waves. At your feet, damp sand reflects the twilight, while overhead, the deep blue sky fades into a cloudy mélange of sunset copper and gold, so vivid it almost takes your breath away.

A breeze touches the back of your neck, and you turn to see a pale full Moon rising into the night. Hmmm. The Moon could use a dash more color. You reach out, grab a handful of sunset, and drape the Moon with phantasmic light. Much better.

Images of the Recent Lunar Eclipse

Just in case you missed it, here is a great collection of images from the recent lunar eclipse! Many of the images are absolutely amazing!

Take a look here: http://www.flickr.com/groups/loony/pool/

-Matt

Total Lunar eclipse visible from large parts of the world

On March 3rd a total eclipse of the Moon will occur. The totallity will be visible from parts of all seven continents on Earth, and viewers in Africa and Europe will be able to follow the complete 71 min totality.

  • Penumbral Eclipse Begins: 20:18:11 UTC
  • Partial Eclipse Begins: 21:30:22 UTC
  • Total Eclipse Begins: 22:44:13 UTC
  • Greatest Eclipse: 23:20:56 UTC
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